Archive for March 22nd, 2009

22
Mar
09

Ring-necked Pheasant

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This colorful and elusive fellow is a Ring-necked Pheasant.

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For more information see: http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/261/overview/Ring-necked_Pheasant.aspx

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22
Mar
09

On This Day, March 22: Loyalty Checks

March 22, 1947

Truman orders loyalty checks of federal employees

In response to public fears and Congressional investigations into communism in the United States, President Harry S. Truman issues an executive decree establishing a sweeping loyalty investigation of federal employees.

As the Cold War began to develop after World War II, fears concerning communist activity in the United States, particularly in the federal government, increased. Congress had already launched investigations of communist influence in Hollywood, and laws banning communists from teaching positions were being instituted in several states. Of most concern to the Truman administration, however, were persistent charges that communists were operating in federal offices. In response to these fears and concerns, Truman issued an executive order on March 21, 1947, which set up a program to check the loyalty of federal employees. In announcing his order, Truman indicated that he expected all federal workers to demonstrate “complete and unswerving loyalty” the United States. Anything less, he declared, “constitutes a threat to our democratic processes.”

The basic elements of Truman’s order established the framework for a wide-ranging and powerful government apparatus to perform loyalty checks. Loyalty boards were to be set up in every department and agency of the federal government. Using lists of “totalitarian, fascist, communist, or subversive” organizations provided by the attorney general, and relying on investigations by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, these boards were to review every employee. If there existed “reasonable grounds” to doubt an employee’s loyalty, he or she would be dismissed. A Loyalty Review Board was set up under the Civil Service Commission to deal with employees’ appeals.

Truman’s loyalty program resulted in the discovery of only a few employees whose loyalty could be “reasonably” doubted. Nevertheless, for a time his order did quiet some of the criticism that his administration was “soft” on communism. Matters changed dramatically in 1949-1950. The Soviets developed an atomic bomb, China fell to the communists, and Senator Joseph McCarthy made the famous speech in which he declared that there were over 200 “known communists” in the Department of State. Once again, charges were leveled that the Truman administration was “coddling” communists, and in response, the Red Scare went into full swing.

“Truman orders loyalty checks of federal employees.” 2009. The History Channel website. 22 Mar 2009, 03:27 http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history.do?action=Article&id=2614.

 

On this Day

1457 – Gutenberg Bible became the first printed book.

1630 – The first legislation to prohibited gambling was enacted. It was in Boston, MA.

1638 – Anne Hutchinsoon, a religious dissident, was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

1765 – The Stamp Act was passed. It was the first direct British tax on the American colonists. It was repealed on March 17, 1766.

1794 – The U.S. Congress banned U.S. vessels from supplying slaves to other countries.

1874 – The Young Men’s Hebrew Association was organized in New York City.

1882 – The U.S. Congress outlawed polygamy.

1903 – Niagara Falls ran out of water due to a drought.

1905 – Child miners in Britain received a maximum 8-hour workday.

1933 – U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill legalizing the sale and possession of beer and wine containing up to 3.2% alcohol.

1945 – The Arab League was formed with the adoption of a charter in Cairo, Egypt.

1946 – The British granted Transjordan independence.

1980 – People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) was founded by Ingrid Newkirk and Alex Pacheco.

1988 – The Congress overrode U.S. President Reagan’s veto of a sweeping civil rights bill.

 

March 22, 1965

Officials confirm “non-lethal gas” was provided

The State Department acknowledges that the United States had supplied the South Vietnamese armed forces with a “non-lethal gas which disables temporarily” for use “in tactical situations in which the Viet Cong intermingle with or take refuge among non-combatants, rather than use artillery or aerial bombardment.” This announcement triggered a storm of criticism worldwide. The North Vietnamese and the Soviets loudly protested the introduction of “poison gas” into the war. Secretary of State Dean Rusk insisted at a news conference on March 24 that the United States was “not embarking upon gas warfare,” but was merely employing “a gas which has been commonly adopted by the police forces of the world as riot-control agents.”

“Officials confirm “non-lethal gas” was provided.” 2009. The History Channel website. 22 Mar 2009, 03:25 http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history.do?action=tdihArticleCategory&id=1744.

On This Day in Wisconsin: March 22

1854 – Eugene Shepard, Father of the Hodag
On this date Eugene Shepard was born near Green Bay. Although he made his career in the lumbering business near Rhinelander, he was best known for his story-telling and practical jokes. He told many tales of Paul Bunyan, the mythical lumberjack, and drew pictures of the giant at work that became famous. Shepard also started a new legend about a prehistoric monster that roamed the woods of Wisconsin – the hodag. Shepard built the mythical monster out of wood and bull’s horns. He fooled everyone into believing it was alive, allowing it to be viewed only inside a dark tent. The beast was displayed at the Wausau and Antigo county fairs before Shepard admitted it was all a hoax. [Source: Badger saints and sinners, by Fred L. Holmes, p.459-474]

22
Mar
09

Pranked




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