Posts Tagged ‘Calvin Coolidge

21
Mar
08

On This Day, 3-21-08: Selma, Alabama

Selma to Montgomery march begins

In the name of African-American voting rights, 3,200 civil rights demonstrators, led by Martin Luther King Jr., begin a historic march from Selma, Alabama, to the State Capitol at Montgomery. U.S. Army and National Guard troops were on hand to provide safe passage for the “Alabama Freedom March,” which twice had been turned back by Alabama state police at Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge.

In 1965, King and his Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) decided to make the small town of Selma the focus of their drive to win voting rights for African Americans in the South. Alabama’s governor, George Wallace, was a vocal opponent of the African-American civil rights movement, and local authorities in Selma had consistently thwarted efforts by the Dallas County Voters League and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to register local blacks. King had won the 1964 Nobel Prize for Peace, and the world’s eyes turned to Selma after his arrival there in January 1965. He launched a series of peaceful protests, and by mid-February thousands of protesters in the Selma area had spent time in jail, including King himself.

On February 18, a group of white segregationists attacked some peaceful marchers in the nearby town of Marion. Jimmie Lee Jackson, an African-American demonstrator, was fatally wounded in the melee. After he died, King and the SCLC planned a massive march from Selma to Montgomery. Although Governor Wallace promised to prevent it from going forward, on March 7 some 500 demonstrators, led by SCLC leader Hosea Williams and SNCC leader John Lewis, began the 54-mile march to the state capital. After crossing Pettus Bridge, they were met by Alabama state troopers and posse men who attacked them with nightsticks, tear gas, and whips after they refused to turn back. Several of the protesters were severely beaten, and others ran for their lives. The incident was captured on national television and outraged many Americans. Hundreds of ministers, priests, and rabbis headed to Selma to join the voting rights campaign. King, who was in Atlanta at the time, promised to return to Selma immediately and lead another attempt.

On March 9, King led 1,500 marchers, black and white, across Edmund Pettus Bridge but found Highway 80 blocked again by state troopers. King paused the marchers and led them in prayer, whereupon the troopers stepped aside. King then turned the protesters around, believing that the troopers were trying to create an opportunity that would allow them to enforce a federal injunction prohibiting the march. This decision led to criticism from some marchers who called King cowardly. In Selma that night, James Reeb, a white minister from Boston, was fatally beaten by a group of segregationists.

Six days later, on March 15, President Lyndon Johnson went on national television to pledge his support to the Selma protesters and call for the passage of a new voting rights bill that he was introducing in Congress. “There is no Negro problem. There is no Southern problem. There is no Northern problem. There is only an American problem,” he said, “And we shall overcome.”

On March 21, U.S. Army troops and federalized Alabama National Guardsmen escorted the marchers across Edmund Pettus Bridge and down Highway 80. When the highway narrowed to two lanes, only 300 marchers were permitted, but thousands more rejoined the Alabama Freedom March as it came into Montgomery on March 25. On the steps of Alabama State Capitol, King addressed live television cameras and a crowd of 25,000, just a few hundred feet from Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, where he got his start as a minister in 1954. That August, Congress passed the Voting Rights Act, which guaranteed African Americans the right to vote. By 1967, African-American registered voters in Alabama had nearly tripled. “Selma to Montgomery march begins.” 2008. The History Channel website. 20 Mar 2008, 12:10 http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history.do?action=Article&id=6843.

1349 – 3,000 Jews were killed in Black Death riots in Efurt Germany.

1556 – Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, was burned at the stake at Oxford after retracting the last of seven recantations that same day.

1835 – Charles Darwin & Mariano Gonzales met at Portillo Pass.

1851 – Emperor Tu Duc ordered that Christian priests be put to death.

1851 – Yosemite Valley was discovered in California.

1868 – The Sorosos club for professional women was formed in New York City by Jennie June. It was the first of its kind.

1928 – U.S. President Calvin Coolidge gave the Congressional Medal of Honor to Charles Lindbergh for his first trans-Atlantic flight.

1945 – During World War II, Allied bombers began four days of raids over Germany.

1963 – Alcatraz Island, the federal penitentiary in San Francisco Bay, CA, closed.

1965 – The U.S. launched Ranger 9. It was the last in a series of unmanned lunar explorations.

1980 – U.S. President Jimmy Carter announced to the U.S. Olympic Team that they would not participate in the 1980 Summer Games in Moscow as a boycott against Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.

1985 – Larry Flynt offered to sell his pornography empire for $26 million or “Hustler” magazine alone for $18 million.

2002 – In Paris, an 1825 print by French inventor Joseph Nicephore Niepce was sold for $443,220. The print, of a man leading a horse, was the earliest recorded image taken by photographic means.

A man’s friendships are one of the best measures of his worth.
Charles Darwin

If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin.
Charles Darwin

It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.
Charles Darwin

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22
Feb
08

On This Day, 2-22-08: Popcorn

1630 – Quadequine introduced popcorn to English colonists at their first Thanksgiving dinner.

1819 – Spain ceded Florida to the United States.

1855 – The U.S. Congress voted to appropriate $200,000 for continuance of the work on the Washington Monument. The next morning the resolution was tabled and it would be 21 years before the Congress would vote on funds again. Work was continued by the Know-Nothing Party in charge of the project.

1859 – U.S. President Buchanan approved the Act of February 22, 1859, which incorporated the Washington National Monument Society “for the purpose of completing the erection now in progress of a great National Monument to the memory of Washington at the seat of the Federal Government.”

1860 – Organized baseball’s first game was played in San Francisco, CA.

1865 – In the U.S., Tennessee adopted a new constitution that abolished slavery.

1879 – In Utica, NY, Frank W. Woolworth opened his first 5 and 10-cent store.

1885 – The Washington Monument was officially dedicated in Washington, DC. It opened to the public in 1889.

1924 – U.S. President Calvin Coolidge delivered the first presidential radio broadcast from the White House.

1956 – Elvis Presley entered the music charts for the first time. “Heartbreak Hotel” began its climb to the number one spot on the pop listing, reaching the top on April 11, 1956. It stayed at the top for eight weeks.

1973 – The U.S. and Communist China agreed to establish liaison offices.

1984 – The U.S. Census Bureau statistics showed that the state of Alaska was the fastest growing state of the decade with an increase in population of 19.2 percent.

1997 – Scottish scientist Ian Wilmut and colleagues announced that an adult sheep had been successfully cloned. Dolly, the first cloned sheep to be born was born in July 1996.

History that pops
The love of popcorn is nothing new. The history of popcorn consumption stretches back more than 5,000 years. Archaeologists and researchers believe that popcorn is the oldest of a group of five sweet corns that include Indian corn, pod corn, sweet corn and field corn. Popcorn was a new world food, originally grown in Mexico — popcorn ears, more than 5,600 years old, were found in the Bat Cave in New Mexico half a century ago — before spreading globally through India, China and Sumatra long before the first European explorers reached U.S. shores.

Originally throwing it on sizzling hot stones placed over an open fire was the method for popping corn. With no way to contain it, the popcorn would explode in various directions and anyone who wanted to eat it had to find it first.

Native Americans popped corn 2,000 years ago and Christopher Columbus observed West Indian natives wearing popcorn corsages. Popcorn also was used to decorate ceremonial headdresses and enterprising Native Americans sold popcorn to Columbus’s sailors.

Popcorn that is over 1,000 years old was discovered on the east coast of Peru. Preserved by the Peruvian Indians, this popcorn still pops a millennium or so later.

The Aztecs, according to (???????) Cortez, used popcorn to decorate their ceremonial garb as a symbol of goodwill and peace. The Aztecs also fashioned necklaces and other ornaments from popcorn to place on the statues of their deities, particularly that of the god Tialoc who represented rain, fertility and maize.

Ways of popping corn differed over the years. Eschewing throwing kernels on hot slabs, the Iroquois, in the 17th century, popped their corn in pottery containing heated sand. Other ancient poppers were made of soapstone, pottery and metal, some with tripod legs and some large clay containers with lids designed to be set right in the fire.

Popcorn was served at the first Thanksgiving feast, bought to the Pilgrims by Quadequine, a brother of Chief Massasoit of the Wampanoag tribe.
Colonials loved the dish so much, they used to serve it with sugar and cream for breakfast. Popcorn carts, invented in 1885, were so popular that crowds would follow them down the streets, watching the kernels develop.

And popcorn still is one of the most popular snacks. According to popcorn.org, over 17 billion quarts are consumed a year, with the average American eating approximately 59 quarts per person annually.

http://www.nwitimes.com/articles/2004/10/25/features/food/33a13ba2c668daf886256f31006a139e.txt

12
Feb
08

On This Day 2-12-08: Abraham Lincoln

1554 – Lady Jane Grey was beheaded after being charged with treason. She had claimed the throne of England for only nine days.

1733 – Savannah, GA, was founded by English colonist James Oglethorpe.

1870 – In the Utah Territory, women gained the right to vote.

1892 – In the U.S., President Lincoln’s birthday was declared to be a national holiday.

1912 – China’s boy emperor Hsuan T’ung announced that he was abdicating, ending the Manchu Ch’ing dynasty. Subsequently, the Republic of China was established.

1915 – The cornerstone of the Lincoln Memorial was laid in Washington, DC.

1924 – U.S. President Calvin Coolidge made the first presidential political speech on radio.

1971 – James Cash (J.C.) Penney died at the age of 95. The company closed for business for one-half day as a memorial to the company’s founder.

1973 – American prisoners of war were released for the first time during the Vietnam conflict.

1998 – A U.S. federal judge declared that the presidential line-item veto was unconstitutional.

1999 – U.S. President Clinton was acquitted by the U.S. Senate on two impeachment articles. The charges were perjury and obstruction of justice.

2003 – The U.N. nuclear agency declared North Korea in violation of international treaties. The complaint was sent to the Security Council.

No matter what his position or experience in life, there is in everyone more latent than developed ability; far more unused than used power.
James Cash Penney

America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.
Abraham Lincoln

26
Nov
07

Workplace Humor

When more and more people are thrown out of work, unemployment results.
Calvin Coolidge

~~~~~~

The following short quiz consists of 4 questions and tells whether you are qualified to be a “manager”.  The questions are not that difficult.

  1. How do you put a giraffe into a refrigerator?
    The correct answer is: Open the refrigerator, put in the giraffe and close the door.  This question tests whether you tend to do simple things in an overly complicated way.
  2. How do you put an elephant into a refrigerator?
    Wrong Answer :  Open the refrigerator, put in the elephant and close the refrigerator.
    Correct Answer : Open the refrigerator, take out the giraffe, put in the elephant and close the door.
    This tests your ability to think through the repercussions of your actions.
  3. The Lion King is hosting an animal conference, all the animals attend except one. Which animal does not attend?
    Correct Answer :  The Elephant.  The Elephant is in the refrigerator. This tests your memory.

OK, even if you did not answer the first three questions correctly, you still have one more chance to show your abilities.

  1. There is a river you must cross. But it is inhabited by crocodiles. How do you manage it?
    Correct Answer:  You swim across. All the Crocodiles are attending the Animal Meeting! This tests whether you learn quickly from your mistakes.

According to Andersen Consulting World wide, around 90% of the professionals they tested got all questions wrong.  But many pre-schoolers got several correct answers. Andersen Consulting says this conclusively disproves the theory that most management consultants have the brains of a four year old.

Submitted by Powder

~~~~~

Lampner’s Law of Employment: When leaving work late, you will go unnoticed. When you leave work early, you will meet the boss in the parking lot.
 

After a two-year long study, The National Science Foundation announced the following results on Corporate America’s recreational preferences:

  1. The sport of choice for male unemployed or incarcerated individuals is BASKETBALL.
  2. The sport of choice for male maintenance level employees is BOWLING.
  3. The sport of choice for male front-line workers is FOOTBALL.
  4. The sport of choice for male supervisors is BASEBALL.
  5. The sport of choice for male middle management is TENNIS.
  6. The sport of choice for male corporate officers is GOLF.

Conclusion: The higher you are in the corporate structure, the smaller your balls become…

Submitted by DkSdBubba

    The boss was complaining in our staff meeting the other day that he wasn’t getting any respect. Later that morning he went to a local card and novelty shop and bought a small sign that read, “I’m the Boss”. He then taped it to his office door.
    Later that day when he returned from lunch, he found that someone had taped a note to the sign that said. “Your wife called, she wants her sign back!”

You can find many more of these here: http://www.butlerwebs.com/jokes/working.htm




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