Posts Tagged ‘cranes

28
Aug
12

Whooping Crane Searching for Food

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26
Aug
12

More Grus Americana: Whooping Crane

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15
Aug
12

Sandhill Cranes: In Flight

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I had far more wildlife diversity this year as I learn more about how and where to find Wisconsin’s wildlife.  Whitetail deer are prevalent and easy to find.  So easy, in fact, I saw one on the way home from work one morning about three to four blocks from where I live.  Right in the middle of town!  Shooting Wisconsin’s elk has become an annual trip and then there’s Necedah National Wildlife Refuge.  Close enough to where I live so I can photograph there almost any time.

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Because of this years draught the water levels have dropped significantly, so we had fewer appearances from eagles and ospreys this passed weekend, but the sheer numbers and types of birds still there left plenty of opportunities to shoot.

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I had been going over to Necedah on Thursdays or Friday mornings, but this passed weekend I went over on Saturday.  I noted an increase in the numbers of people moving in and around the refuge.  Couples with children who didn’t have the patience required to see anything and of course the official state tourists from Illinois.  A couple from Iowa who travel all over the United States trying to get a look at the whooping cranes.  They stayed for awhile but left just before a pair of whooping cranes flew in.  I also met a newly Americanized kiwi.  A photographer from New Zealand who had just became a naturalized citizen.  I hope all these folks got a chance to see and photograph what they were looking for.

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14
Jul
12

Enter the Guest of Honor

One of the problems I had with photographing at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge was with so much happening I would be looking the wrong way and not see something I wanted to photograph.  For instance,  I was photographing a Great Blue Heron landing.

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After he landed, another bird flew in from the right.  It flew like an Eagle, which I’m always glad for the opportunity to photograph, but it was too far away and I knew the shots wouldn’t turn out well enough.  When I noticed it was flying erratically.  It would stop in mid-air, sort of doing a tail stand.  I remember thinking to myself, What’s wrong with that bird?  Has it forgotten how to fly?  Until, it did one of its tail stands and then dove straight into the water.

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Not something an Eagle does.  That’s when I realized I had been watching an Osprey and his erratic flying was due to him looking for fish.  So I decided to photograph and hope for the best.

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He emerged with a fish.

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All seemed well for the successful Osprey as he flew off with his fish.

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Until I noticed another bird enter the area.  Actually, I didn’t notice it.  I heard it.  It sounded like a Sandhill Crane, but not like any Sandhill Crane I had ever heard.  So I stopped photographing the Osprey and looked in the direction of the sound I heard and in an instant I remembered why I was there.

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Enter Grus americana in Latin, Whooping Crane to everyone else.  Necedah National Wildlife Refuge is one of two summer homes of this bird.  The other being in Western Canada.  Whooping Cranes are an endangered species.  There are fewer than five hundred of these birds in the wild, and while I wish I had closer shots, these are the best I have.  This is the only Whooping Crane I saw during my two trips into the refuge last week, but it is the reason I went and I was thrilled to see this one.

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It landed in this field, which was about a mile from me, or less than two thousand meters but still a long ways away.

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A Sandhill Crane watches the larger bird land, while a Great Blue Heron preens itself in the bottom right corner of the photo.

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I kind of have a sense of how large this bird is because I know how big the Sandhill Crane is.  Sandhill Cranes, basically, are about three to four feet in height, or 1 to 1.2 meters.  Whopping Cranes can get as large as five feet or 1.5 meters in height.

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I remained there for about five hours.  The Whooping Crane settled into the tall grasses and occasionally I saw it poke its head up to see what was going on, while I contented myself with photographing the other birds.

29
May
12

More Sandhill Cranes

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28
May
12

Sandhill Cranes Active Again

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Sandhill Cranes nest on the ground and when nesting they get very quiet.  When the nestlings first hatch these big birds don’t stray far from the nest.  Yesterday, very early in the morning, I could hear Sandhill Cranes calling.  They are very vocal and can be heard for miles.

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I also saw them take flight for the first time since their eggs hatched.  My conclusion is the young must be old enough to defend themselves so the parents can demonstrate to the young what these birds do.  Make noise and fly.  I found a you tube video that will let you hear them.

Today is the last chance I’ll have for fawn pictures until Thursday.

01
May
12

Time to Find a New Spot

A few weeks ago I discovered a new vantage point, which gave me a few decent opportunities to capture eagles, geese, ducks and cranes in flight.  This passed weekend I noticed a distinct change in the bird’s behavior.

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Eagles love to grab air.  In the afternoon, as temperatures warm, thermal air currents will rise up from the Earth.  Eagles will grab these up-currents and float higher and higher into the air.  This eagle is up about two to three thousand feet at this point and from here I have read they can spot a field mouse from three miles away.  I had just sat down in my cleverly concealed spot when I looked up to see this eagle floating directly above my head.  The game was up.  I’d been spotted.  I knew the eagles wouldn’t fly anywhere near me, but I held out hope some of the other birds would.

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Four Sandhill Cranes had been flying directly at me, and then seemed to notice me sitting there and abruptly changed course.  They then headed away from me.  So my spot is tainted.  The birds are onto me.  Guess I’ll have to find somewhere new to shoot.




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